Pregnancy Discrimination Is Not Permitted

Based on state and federal laws, employers must not treat pregnancy differently than temporary disabilities. Regardless of their marital status, pregnant women must not be treated differently than other employees in any part of the employment process, including hiring, promotion, benefits, training or firing. Employers must also provide work accommodations for women suffering from morning sickness and other pregnancy-related medical conditions.

If you believe your employer discriminated against you because of your pregnancy, speak with an employment law attorney at Le Clerc & Le Clerc LLP. We have dedicated our careers to protecting the rights of employees from unlawful discrimination. We have the experience and skill to evaluate your situation and determine how to proceed. Please call us at 415-445-0900 for a free consultation with our San Francisco pregnancy discrimination lawyers.

Pregnant Workers Have The Same Rights As All Employees

The California Fair Employment and Housing Act and the Pregnancy Disability Leave Law prohibit employers or potential employers from discriminating against women because of pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions.

In California, this includes protection from employment discrimination regarding hiring and firing, breast-feeding and morning sickness, and pregnant women must be allowed to use pregnancy leave for severe morning sickness. In fact, pregnant women can use their leave in mere increments of an hour if it is necessary for them to do so because, for example, they are suffering from severe morning sickness.

How Were You Discriminated Against?

Pregnancy discrimination claims may include issues such as:

  • Firing a woman for taking maternity leave
  • Not hiring a woman because she is pregnant
  • Not allowing a pregnant employee to continue working during her pregnancy
  • Treating pregnancy differently in terms of health insurance and benefits
  • Failing to allow a pregnant woman to take disability leave from work on the advice of her medical care provider
  • Firing or demoting a woman for taking leave on the advice of her medical care provider
  • Not allowing a man or woman to take baby bonding leave after the birth of his or her child, if he or she is qualified for it
  • Firing or demoting a man or woman for taking leave to bond with his or her newborn baby

Numerous laws protect women from pregnancy discrimination. Discuss your case with us to learn how we may assist you.

Contact An Experienced Attorney

To schedule a free consultation, please call 415-445-0900 or contact us online.